Press ESC to close

0 198
6

KOL Spotlight Interviews is a segment where we interview experts from various fields on their expertise and insights that help shape the diagnostic and pharmaceutical industries. This month, we had the pleasure of speaking to Dr. Balazs Halmos, Professor of Medicine, Chief, Thoracic/Head & Neck Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine. In this interview, Dr. Halmos shared his experience as an oncologist during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly with hematological malignancies, or blood cancers.

0 1066
6

Bartonellosis is an infectious disease caused by Bartonella species and is implicated in causing many emerging and re-emerging infections globally. While there are multiple species, the three most common Bartonella species (and the infections they cause) are: Bartonella henselae (Cat Scratch Disease), Bartonella quintana (Trench fever), and Bartonella bacilliformis (Oroya fever).

0 1660
7

Many families of patients with autoimmune encephalitis suffer in silence; without understanding the outcome of their family member’s diagnosis. However, two patient families, the “Egger’s and McDow’s” aimed to change this. Both families’ journeys with autoimmune encephalitis lead to the formation one of the world’s largest organizations to support patients and advance research in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune encephalitis. Listen and read about their empowering journey that led to the formation of “Autoimmune Encephalitis Alliance”.

0 1037
4

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is caused when the immune system sends antibodies to attack your joints, leading to joint destruction and disability. While there is no current cure for RA, treatment is possible. Treatment of RA is best done within 3 to 6 months after symptoms start, since permanent joint damage can occur within the first 2 years. This blog will discuss the common antibodies which are tested for in RA diagnosis, and highlight additional uses of antibody testing in RA.

0 1459
5

The number of Powassan virus (POWV) reported cases is low compared to other tick-borne diseases such as Lyme disease. However, the prevalence of POWV infection is likely underestimated because testing capabilities are limited. There are no FDA-cleared assays and only a few commercially available assays. There is a need to increase the awareness of POWV infection to include this testing in clinical routine labs.